20 posts by yonetici-lcy

Ethics in Spinoza’s Ethics

Authors: Steven Barbone (Associate Professor of Philosophy at San Diego State University.) & Jungwoo Seo (Torrey Pines High School.) Baruch (meaning “blessed”) de Spinoza was born in 1632 to a Jewish family living in Amsterdam, a city that welcomed Jewish refugees fleeing the Spanish Inquisition, including Spinoza’s grandparents. His intelligence was recognized early on, and he was given an excellent education at the synagogue. Spinoza’s curious mind led him to study not only ...

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Spinoza on God and Nature

Author: Dino Jakušić (DAAD Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Tübingen; Sessional Tutor, University of Warwick.) What does Spinoza mean by “God or Nature”? The Latin word sive (or sometimes seu) Spinoza employs here and throughout his Ethics is used to identify the two terms under consideration, rather than separate them. Hence for Spinoza God is Nature and Nature is God. But there is an ambiguity here. Which part of the two should we emphasise? Is Spinoza here reducing God to Nature, ...

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Spinoza’s Political Philosophy

Author: Sandra Leonie Field (Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Yale-NUS College, Singapore.) ... Many find Hobbes’s political conclusions unacceptable. University syllabi often pair Hobbes with Locke, who argues that the state’s authority is delegated from the people, and must be used for the people’s benefit. When the state behaves tyrannically (in the judgement of the people), then they are justified in rebelling. In our contemporary world, people argue back and forth about ...

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Are Pluralistic Societies Doomed to Collapse? Spinoza and His Conservative Critics

Author: Jason Waller (Associate Professor of Philosophy at Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. ) One of the most influential –and controversial– books in European history that you have probably never heard of is Benedict de Spinoza’s Theological-Political Treatise published in 1670. The treatise landed like a bomb among the intellectuals of the seventeenth (and eighteenth) centuries. Governments acted immediately to suppress it and within a year the book was outlawed in every country in ...

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Moby Dick: A Spinozist Tritone Fugue

Author: Ahmet Aktaş (Boğaziçi University.) ... Moby Dick is like a tritone fugue in which the three layers of its narrative develop and intermingle with each other. Three narrative styles, developing into a single voice, can be designated as such: an internal or psychological narrative, an external or pragmatic narrative, and a peripheral or rhetorical narrative. The internal narrative consists of the inner speeches of Ahab and the other captains, while external narrative mainly ...

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The Philosopher Spinoza and the Sciences

Author: Filip A. A. Buyse (Senior Visiting Researcher at the University of Oxford.) Today, Spinoza (1632-1677) is one of the most popular early modern philosophers. The Dutch philosopher is well-known for his political philosophy which he explained in his Tractatus theologico-politicus (1670) as well as in his unfinished Tractatus Politicus. He was one of the first thinkers to have defended radical democratic ideas. Of course, he is also known for his metaphysics which he explains in the ...

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Spinoza’s Politics of Immanent Transcendence

Authors: Joseph Bermas-Dawes (PhD candidate at DePaul University.) & A. Kiarina Kordela (Professor of German at Macalester College.) Essential to Spinoza’s argumentation in the Theologico-Political Treatise is the link between power, truth and obedience.1 Spinoza analyzes these terms not by contrasting religion and politics but rather by likening them. Obedience –to either God or political authority– can be produced out of ignorance and superstition when a subject’s passions are ...

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Overcoming the Virus of Hate: Spinoza on Conversion of the Emotions

Author: Marie-Élise Zovko (Institute of Philosophy, Zagreb. ) Cases of police brutality in the US and global anti-rascism protests, the Covid-19 pandemic with its unequal effects on rich and poor, the ongoing migrant and refugee crisis —these and other recent events have shown that despite advances in human rights, despite efforts to eliminate poverty, mitigate suffering, end conflicts, despite initiatives to promote solidarity, community, friendship, we are far from healing the ills ...

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A Short Introduction to Death, Pain and Loneliness

Author: Aysel Demir (Kırıkkale University, Assoc. Prof.) We are human being and born alone, go through life alone and die alone. Although we are all equals in death which is certain to come, we usually think in life that death will come to other people, not us. We live as if we never die. However, we know that we will die one day and not be in this world anymore. If we accept that each of us will one day die and life is not endless, then what is the point of our life? At this point, we ...

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After the Cogito: Lacan on Psychoanalysis, Science and Religion

Author: Itzhak Benyamini (Bar-Ilan University, PhD.) This paper examines the way Jacques Lacan defines psychoanalysis in the 1950s as distinct from both religion and science. Psychoanalysis, religion, and science, I shall argue, constitute a paradigmatic triangle for Lacan. In contrast to Freud’s prevalent image as a scientifically-minded and anti-religious person, Lacan’s position is much more intricate to begin with. On the one hand, he does not consider himself a man of the enlight...

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