12 posts by yonetici-lcy

A Short Introduction to Death, Pain and Loneliness

Author: Aysel Demir (Kırıkkale University, Assoc. Prof.) We are human being and born alone, go through life alone and die alone. Although we are all equals in death which is certain to come, we usually think in life that death will come to other people, not us. We live as if we never die. However, we know that we will die one day and not be in this world anymore. If we accept that each of us will one day die and life is not endless, then what is the point of our life? At this point, we ...

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After the Cogito: Lacan on Psychoanalysis, Science and Religion

Author: Itzhak Benyamini (Bar-Ilan University, PhD.) This paper examines the way Jacques Lacan defines psychoanalysis in the 1950s as distinct from both religion and science. Psychoanalysis, religion, and science, I shall argue, constitute a paradigmatic triangle for Lacan. In contrast to Freud’s prevalent image as a scientifically-minded and anti-religious person, Lacan’s position is much more intricate to begin with. On the one hand, he does not consider himself a man of the enlight...

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In Socrates’ footsteps: The deep entanglement of love and wisdom

Author: Laura Candiotto (Alexander von Humboldt Foundation Senior Research Fellow at the Free University of Berlin.) Socrates the Sylenus, Socrates the gadfly, Socrates the doctor of the soul, Socrates the babbling sophist, Socrates the master, Socrates the corrupter of the youth… We could add many other epithets to this list about the great philosopher who lived in 5th century BC Athens. Indeed, Plato and the other Socratics provided extraordinary snapshots of this man whose thought and ...

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Jacques Derrida and the Controversy of Philosophy

Author: Ian Angus (Simon Fraser University, Prof. Emerit.) The controversy surrounding Derrida’s death invites a late contribution such as this one to analyze the specific features of this controversy, especially since so much of Derrida’s own reflections on death, mourning and heritage could be brought to bear. While I am sure that this would be of interest, this is not the tack that I will take. I will, however, hold onto the thread of controversy itself. It is perhaps possible to ...

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Camus on Absurdity

Author: Steven Luper (Trinity University) In the preface to his book, Camus says that Myth of Sisyphus was meant to resolve the problem of suicide, which he equated with the question of whether suicide is the right response to the absurdity of life. His main thesis is that life is absurd but suicide is not the right response. In what follows I will briefly sketch his view of the absurd and how we ought to respond to it. Unfortunately, as will emerge, I cannot endorse his position.  ...

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The Possibility of Ethics in the Condition of the Oppressed

Author: Nathalie Nya (John Carroll University, PhD.) Concerned with how other people shape the subjectivity of women and restrict their possibilities to make moral choices, Simone de Beauvoir, in The Ethics of Ambiguity, argues the condition of women is in the state of childhood, which in turn makes women submissive in relation to men. However, in proposing this claim, she limits the moral choices that individual women can make within their social situations, which is based on their ...

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Reading and Interdependence

Author: Gerasimos Kakoliris (University of Athens, PhD.) For Εmmanuel Lévinas, (1906-1995) the lesson Socrates has bequeathed us is self-sufficiency and the primacy of the Same (Même): “to receive nothing of the Other but what is in me, as though from all eternity I was in possession of what comes to me from the outside —to receive nothing, or to be free”. Levinas refers here to the Socratic method of maieutics and by extension to reminiscence theory. According to this particular ...

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Death, Quantum, and the Techno-Singularity

Author: István Aranyosi (Bilkent University, PhD.) Quantum mechanics (QM) is whacky. It is hard to offer an interpretation of its formalism in a way that would satisfy everyone in terms of requirements of clarity and intuitiveness. The main culprit is the wave function, an equation that is supposed to describe the behavior of an isolated quantum system. The problem is a conflict between the probabilistic nature of the wave function and the deterministic nature of what we experience, when ...

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Is Death an Evil?

Author: Jonathan Beale (Researcher-in-Residence, Eton College) [D]eath, the most terrifying of ills, is nothing to us, since so long as we exist death is not with us; but when death comes, we do not exist. It does not then concern either the living or the dead, since for the former it is not, and the latter are no more. –Epicurus Is death bad for the one who dies? Of course, one’s death can be bad for others; in that sense, death is usually a tragedy. But that is not the concern of ...

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When Zombies are real: Thinking About The Death Of The Other

Author: Jorge Gonzalez Arocha (University of Havana, PhD.) The Day My Father Died Last year was, without any doubt, the worst of my life. Among the adverse events, the most shocking was the death of my father. He was more than 6000 miles away, and the news surprised me in the middle of a series of circumstances that made it impossible for me to attend his death. Within minutes of receiving the news, I tried to calm myself down with the idea that I had been studying this subject for ...

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